An Effective Consultation

Approaching hair growth disorders in order to take effective action starts with dialogue.
No matter who you are, the sooner you can start a dialogue, based on facts, the better the final outcome would be.

If you have a hair growth disorder (hair thinning, hair loss or other) or you are a healthcare or industry professional (doctor, pharmacist, aesthetician or other), there is certain knowledge and effective conversational measures that provide key knowledge to be able to approach the dialogue in the right manner – and which will ensure an effective consultation.

 

Do You Experience Hair Growth Issues? Learn How to Increase Your Chances of Success When Consulting a Professional

If you are a consumer consulting a professional about a hair growth disorder or hair loss, you need to know that the types and causes of hair thinning and hair loss are difficult to pinpoint without professional counsel (be it from the doctor, pharmacist, hair care professional, trichologist or dermatologist).

To increase your chance of success when seeking help and advice, keep an open mind and be prepared for the fact that you may not get answers to all of your questions the first time around.

Be Brave
Learn why it is important to approach your medical consultation with confidence and ensure that your chosen advisor understands the real impact that your hair growth disorder has on your life.

You may find yourself in a situation where the person you have entrusted with your confidence, when opening up about your hair loss issue, does not seem to understand how serious the situation is for you, or is able to fully empathise with how you feel about your hair growth disorder.

“…Don’t worry, at least you’ll look like your father.”

“…You’re 50 years old, you’ve lost 50% of your hair and you’re halfway through your life…that seems fair.”

“…It’s a shame you’re so short, if you were taller people wouldn’t notice your hair so much.”

Believe it or not, the above quotes are real responses from real doctors when confronted by female patients concerned about hair growth disorders.

Talking about a hair growth disorder is a big step and often requires a great deal of self-confidence and trust – and a friend or close confidant is often the first person people turn to. However, people are increasingly turning to their doctor for help and support with hair growth disorders, e.g. thinning hair and hair loss.

Your chosen advisor should be someone you can trust no matter what issue or situation you might face. Although thinning hair and hair loss may not be a life-threatening condition, they are certainly life-altering, and your advisor should always take these concerns seriously – as they are important for you.

Therefore, it is important that you are brave and insistent about the degree of importance and seriousness your hair growth issue has for you. The longer you suffer in silence, the worse your problem will get.

Be Factual
You naturally expect the person you confide in to have an immediate solution…but you can find yourself in a situation where he or she does not fully appreciate or understand your hair loss concerns.

Learn these tips to ensure that you steer the conversation, so your problem remains in focus, and that you get the right solution for you.

Recent research, commissioned by the World Hair Council, revealed important and new factual insight about women and hair growth disorders.

Overall, 71% of women experienced a form of hair loss at some time in their life.
Of these,

  • 83% felt that it has affected their confidence
  • 71% felt that it has affected their socialising
  • 57% felt that it has affected their work
  • 85% felt that it has affected their attractiveness

More specifically, 78% of women felt that their life today is generally more stressful than five years ago.
Of these,

  • 89% felt that this has had an impact on their hair’s physical appearance
  • 30% spoke briefly to their hairdresser about temporary cosmetic solutions
  • 34% turned to a friend or family member to talk to about their emotional frustration
  • 46% suffered in unnecessary silence

If you feel that your chosen advisor does not take you seriously, or are apprehensive about having the conversation about hair loss, there are a few simple tips you can use to assert yourself and truly be heard, and taken seriously:

Describe the Situation from Your Perspective
Start by using objective language to talk about the situation seen through your eyes, and do not exaggerate or embellish. Do not let the conversation go off track before you feel that you have fully expressed all of your objective observations.

The different hair loss types and causes are often difficult to determine, even for professional advisors, so by effectively communicating specific observations and time frames you will allow your chosen advisor to obtain the best possible preliminary, factual understanding of the issue.

Describe How the Situation Makes You Feel
Communicating your feelings about your hair loss symptoms is also an important element, but should not be confused with the objective facts.

A woman’s emotional well-being and overall quality of life is a truly valid argument, but a professional advisor will be able to effectively sympathise and empathise, based on what is communicated to him or her, but only if it is communicated in a structured manner.

Therefore, no matter how frustrated you might be, it is important that you describe your emotions instead of displaying your emotions.

Ask for an Honest Opinion, Further Guidance and a Realistic Timeframe
Despite the actual condition or ailment, more and more patients are known to approach a consultation with a preconceived diagnosis based on internet research or poor advice in order to obtain certain treatments or prescriptions.

Therefore, be careful about celebrity-endorsed treatments and mail order miracle products that claim to be the latest celebrity secret.

To increase your chance of success with a professional advisor, keep an open mind and be prepared for the fact that you may not get answers to all questions the first time around.

However, do not despair, as no matter what type of hair growth disorder you have, the Hair Growth Cycle will always be negatively affected, often with an underlying Proteoglycan Follicular Atrophy.

Therefore, as a first line approach you should look for a clinically proven Proteoglycan Replacement Therapy that normalises the Hair Growth Cycle – and remember, this takes time (3-6 months).

Learn more about the Hair Growth Cycle

Are You a Healthcare Professional?

If you are a healthcare professional, increase your chances of a successful experience when advising a subject with hair growth issues?

Find out Why Only 18% of Women Speak to Their General Practitioner About Hair Growth Disorders, and What You Can Do to Turn This Around

For your patient or client, hair growth disorders are as much an emotional experience as a physical experience – probably to a higher degree than you may realise.

Always remember that hair is an important aspect of your patient’s/client’s own personal identity. It gives them a sense of confidence, health and personality, and it may even be the one natural asset that helps provide a source of income.

As you will know, there is no limit to the different meanings men and women associate with their hair, and the impact a hair growth disorder can have.

Recent research commissioned by the World Hair Council brought important and new insight about the relationship women have to their healthcare professional on the subject of hair growth disorders and has revealed important and new factual insight about women and their hair growth disorders.

Overall, 71% of women experienced a form of hair loss at some time in their life.
Of these,

  • 83% felt that it has affected their confidence
  • 71% felt that it has affected their socialising
  • 57% felt that it has affected their work
  • 85% felt that it has affected their attractiveness

More specifically, 78% of women felt that their life today is generally more stressful than five years ago.
Of these,

  • 89% felt that this has had an impact on their hair’s physical appearance
  • 30% spoke briefly to their hairdresser about temporary cosmetic solutions
  • 34% turned to a friend or family member to talk to about their emotional frustration
  • 46% suffered in unnecessary silence

However, surprisingly only a mere 18% spoke to their general practitioner about the problem.

The Problem These 18% Experienced When Consulting with Their General Practitioner

Of the 18% of women who turned to a healthcare professional, the majority felt that their general practitioner did not take the problem seriously enough. This caused increased frustration and a negative psychological impact among hair loss sufferers – ultimately leading to a decreased quality of life.

Therefore, it is important that women suffering from hair growth disorders must be led to understand that they are not alone and that they can actually take effective action to improve their situation. Remember, any improvement, however small, will have a highly significant impact on your patient’s quality of life.

As a healthcare professional or pharmacist, you have a chance, as well as an obligation, to inform your patient/client that no matter the type or cause of hair loss, the Hair Growth Cycle is always negatively affected, as most likely there is an underlying Proteoglycan Follicular Atrophy at play.

Therefore, as a first line approach you will never go wrong by recommending a baseline Proteoglycan Replacement Therapy that directly supports the Hair Growth Cycle; the patient will feel that they are taking effective action to improve their hair growth disorder – and you can then follow your normal treatment flow.

Read more about Proteoglycan Replacement Therapy.